The influential annual report from Interbrand – The Global Brands Report – launched earlier this month with a whole host of household names making up the world’s ‘top 100’ most valuable brands.

Of course this isn’t the only one of its kind, but a comprehensive methodology – spanning market, brand, competitor and financial information to create a single framework by which a brand’s performance can be assessed – makes it a credible, valuable resource for anyone working in the world of the brand.

This year’s list make for particularly interesting reading because for the first time (since the report launched in 2000) Coca-Cola has been knocked off the top spot and replaced by the might of Apple.

In 2000 Apple ranked number 36 with a brand value of $6.6 billion, today it’s valued at $98.3 billion.

While that’s pretty remarkable by anyone’s standards, this probably won’t come as a surprise to many. Despite more recent reports that Apple is losing its knack for innovation, it has a long history of world dominance with exceptional innovation at every level.

While the iPhone and iPad were both revolutionary when they first came to market, the competition has since raised its game and Apple is appearing to lackluster when it comes to innovation, but it’s the power of the Apple brand that has seen it through; the iPhone may not be the best on the market, but it’s the one that everyone wants.

What’s interesting about Apple’s rise in brand value, which is almost 15 times of that in 2000, is that the experts at Interbrand put its success down to “the way it has created a seamless omnichannel experience for customers”.

Apple’s customer centric approach ensures that a first-class customer experience runs through every available channel from its bricks and mortar stores to mobile devices, TV and direct mail.

It offers a fantastic best practice model for the industry, proving that by understanding your audience inside out you are able to both meet current needs and desires as well as anticipate what they will want next, helping to ensure a prime market position and financial success.

At The Market we wholeheartedly support and practice Apple’s approach – insight and a good dollop of intuition are vital to the success of every campaign and finding those little nuggets that will really make a shopper act is our aim in life. We champion a thorough approach to gathering customer insight, placing equal value on emotion, intuition and gut reaction. We use a range of techniques from shopalongs and in-store observation to retail safaris and market analysis to provide a base for all our campaigns.

Consumers are becoming more demanding; they want what they want, where they want it and when they want it and if a brand can deliver on all accounts then they’re certainly a force to be reckoned with.

Adam Tregaskis