Christmas TV Adverts – behaviour in action


It’s the time of year where brands launch their Christmas TV campaigns one by one, and the world (well, the advertising world anyway) waits with bated breath to view, review and judge them as ‘winners’ and ‘losers’.

This isn’t one of those posts – if you want to know whether John Lewis has done what it needs to do, there are countless articles that will try to answer that for you.

At The Market Creative, we’re interested in the application of behavioural economics to brand and marketing communications. We see the Christmas advert season as a great way to watch as brands try to influence consumer behaviour in a host of different ways but all with the same aim – to buy all the gifts, food and treats they’re going to buy from them at this important time of year.

Our favourite examples for 2018 are:

Cadbury – Secret Santa

This works as a great brand advert, showing the emotion associated with giving (and receiving) gifts, but the appeal to join in with Cadbury’s ‘Biggest ever Secret Santa’ invites people to make a ‘commitment pledge’, that makes them more likely to purchase.

Boots – Get them something that says… you get them

Lots of brand ads appeal to the behaviour of “I buy with my heart, not my head” that motivates our system 1 decision making process. This is a beautifully executed example with a personal story that’s easy to relate to.

TK Maxx – The Neverending Stocking

The bizarreness effect in action. That’s all that needs to be said.

As an agency, influencing behaviours is core to what we do and applying Behavioural Economics to marketing communications is a natural progression. If you are interested in understanding more about how we do this get in touch now.

Find out more about the connection between consumers and behavioural economics in our latest report on the top trends driving consumer behaviour. Download it here.

By Charlotte Sadler

Senior Account Manager