Case Study

FebrezeThe Febreze Happy Social Experiment


Febreze wanted to show how they can eliminate any odour. So, with wrestling being the most odorous sport around, they sponsored the Azerbaijani Olympic Wrestling Team during the 2012 London Olympics. Spraying Febreze over used, sweaty jockstraps and wrestling boots from the team, they dangled the apparel in front of random, blindfolded Londoners and videotaped them guessing the smell. From strawberry milkshake, to passionfruit, to floral bouquet, a spritz of Febreze did the trick.

The brand also placed consumers near a goat, large odorous fish, a toilet, a body builder’s armpit and a used janitor’s mop during another experiment. And once again, the random, blindfolded consumers were none the wiser to the objects, guessing pleasant Febreze scents. The visuals off the back of the experiment were memorable and highly convincing that the product was extremely effective.

Results

  • Six experiments conducted in New York, Los Angeles, Buenos Aires and Berlin, reaching people on the street in very populated areas
  • Reactions were so convincing that they were used in the new campaign
  • Febreze is now the fastest growing brand at Procter & Gamble
  • Just passed the $1 billion mark in sales

BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS USED

A covert operation is at play here – PRIMING. This is a form of cognitive bias that works by exposing someone to a product feature that can later influence their behaviour without them knowing. Here Febreze use an out of context association for the brand to connect them to the removal of even the most vile smells: mens pants! So that when shoppers identify their own vile smell there is an immediate association. 

Case Study

TideBradshaw stain


Tide staged a live product demonstration during the first half of Super Bowl XLI. It involved Fox announcer and four-time Super Bowl champion, Terry Bradshaw, appearing on the show live with a noticeable stain. A commercial then aired ten minutes later, which revealed that the stain was planted on purpose, and that Tide were the ones who could eliminate Terry’s wardrobe malfunction.

During the stain’s appearance and Tide revealing their involvement, Tide’s CEO, David Taylor, amplified the ‘live TV moment’ over on social media. He made sure the conversation went viral, using an intricate network of influencers, paid media and content creation.

Results

  • Created a once-in-a-lifetime brand moment
  • Awarded 12 Cannes Lions
  • Saw a 22% growth in PODS sales

BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS USED

PRIMING (see above) to the max. Priming you to believe that serious wardrobe malfunctions and embarrassing TV moments can be avoided with Tide.