Case Study

Daniel Wellingtoninfluencer marketing


When delving into successful influencer marketing that’s seamlessly integrated with a social media marketing campaign, the list would be incomplete without Daniel Wellington. The Swedish watchmaker has managed to leverage their brand effectively with the help of influencers in different niches, but mainly lifestyle and fashion.

As part of their social media marketing strategy, the brand didn’t make use of traditional advertising, but solely focused on word-of-mouth advertising through influencers. They enlisted the help of top Instagrammers, who promoted the brand through eye-catching images and branded hashtags to raise awareness and boost conversions. They also encouraged followers to post their own images using the branded hashtag, #danielwellington. And they even gave some influencers their own personal discount code.

Influencers who’ve got involved include @meiinspsn, who has over 59,000 Instagram followers and gained over 8,000 on her post with the brand. And fashion entrepreneur @sarahlolathings also posted successful sponsored images along with @kimmyschram.

Results

  • Managed to earn a revenue of $220 million by 2015, coming from a $15,000 start-up
  • The #danielwellington hashtag has generated more than 900,000 Instagram posts

BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS USED

Authorities come in all shapes and sizes these days, but consumers remain steadfastly and irrationally trusting in the judgement of experts. Known as the AUTHORITY BIAS it’s the fundamental behaviour at play in influencer marketing.

Case Study

Glossiermicro-influencers


Founded in 2014, Glossier is a relatively new brand that has skyrocketed quickly thanks to strong influencer marketing. The brand doesn’t focus on follower count but prioritises the engagement rates of potential partners.

For example, they’ve worked with Instagram user Cecilia Gorgon who has around 8,500 followers. Gorgon isn’t a content creator or celebrity by any means, she simply describes herself as “a student at the University of Michigan living in Ann Arbor and majoring in Fine Arts”, in an Into the Gloss article published late last year. She posted a photo of the brand’s Priming Moisturizer Rich, encouraging her followers to purchase it because she’d “been testing it out the past few days and it’s so moisturising.” Gorgon added that face cream made her “skin feel like a baby’s booty”.

Another example of Glossier’s micro-influencer strategy is the Glossier reps program. Made up of influencers and customers, the program started off with 11 reps and now has close to 500. The reps program doesn’t discriminate on followers or engagement, they just want people who get the brand. Glossier recently flew 13 of their reps to NYC for 48 hours. One of those reps, beauty vlogger, Amy Serrano, has a strong following of 47,000 YouTube subscribers and documented the whole excursion. And with a dozen other reps documenting their trips, the reach and engagement from the trip was sure to be significant.

Results

  • Two days after posting, Serrano’s video boasted more than 5,000 views, 350 likes and 57 comments
  • Serrano dedicated four Instagram posts to the trip which gained over 2,900 likes and almost 50 comments

BEHAVIOURAL ECONOMICS USED

Another bias underpins the social media revolution and that’s, FOLLOWING THE HERD – people’s tendency to do what others are doing. And by leveraging an army of micro bloggers, Glossier are able to create more personal connections between the influencer and their herd.